sick dog

my puppy Coco was on the sick list

The vet has said your dog needs bed rest? Then you must ensure this happens. But how? Read this post for essential guidelines | FREE BOOK | #newpuppy, #dogtraining, #newrescuedog, #doghealth, #dogbehavior, #dogimpulsecontrol | www.brilliantfamilydog.com

Poor Cocopup!

I remember it so clearly:  one minute he was having a fantastic game of catch the frisbee and chasing Cricket with her frisbee, the next minute a yawning chasm opened up before him, swallowed his front leg and twisted his shoulder.

The shrieking! Ow ow ow, he cried.

After a visit to the vet for x-rays, diagnosis and anti-inflammatories, he was sentenced to a few weeks’ bed rest.

For a young miniature poodle - poodles have everlasting energy, in case you didn’t know - this

was hard!

And inexplicable.

Easy peasy

But the whole thing was made easy because Coco loves his crate, takes himself there when tired, and knows to settle down as soon as he’s in it.

We also do a lot of matwork, regularly. This translates now to any mat or bed I point him to. He will stay there until released.

He got regular sessions with his very own Canine Massage Therapist to aid a fast recovery, which he absolutely loved.

So while I was working, he was stretched out on his bed beside me. When I couldn’t be paying attention he could go in his crate. I was able to achieve the bed rest prescribed by the vet without any stress on the part of my dog.

Or me.

Stress on top of injury

An injured dog is already stressed enough. Confining a dog who isn’t used to it could add a lot more anxiety and tension.

Of course Coco got out for garden visits, lap visits, and some trick training, aka therapy for the injured leg (“Take a Bow” gave him an excellent shoulder-stretch). But preventing him racing and playing with the other dogs was the hard part.

Soon we were able to graduate to short road walks.

It was a while before young Mr.Coco was joyfully chasing his frisbee again.

But at least the time passed calmly.

Could your dog do this?

You never know when you may need to keep your dog quiet for a period. Want to know how to get your dog to this calm, accepting state?

Go to Calm Down and get your free copy.

Now you can work through the steps and teach your dog how to relax - any time, any place, any how. It is an enjoyable method, gets super results, and makes life easier for all of us.

What’s not to love?!

 But why listen to me when you can see what readers think!

I love your books! Your simple, fun, and loving training methods are helping me make tremendous progress with my brilliant puppies. 

Mary Anne and her two Springer Spaniels, USA

 

AMAZON 5* review

This book is excellent and so clearly written my 7 year old is enjoying working through the stages with us. After two short training sessions our 9 week old pup is already lying on his mat as soon as I put it out. The author is clearly very knowledgable and when I emailed her a question I received a very informative personal reply. I have read books 2 and 3 in the series also and can honestly say they make training my pup an absolute pleasure for both of us.

Dianne and Ted, UK

 

Three dog trainers, two behaviour specialist vets, three vets ... and a six month old  terrier who thinks he’s a tiny pup, a fierce crocodile, and a bucking bronco. Went to purchase your book Calm Down! but got it for zero payment on Amazon. Read it, started training - immediate success. The difference has been amazing, pup is now snoozing near me, with a constant eye on me but definitely better! I want to send you a big, heartfelt thank you.

Ute and Gilbert, Germany

 

AMAZON 5* review

I bought Calm Down! before the arrival of my 8 week old puppy. In under 5 days I had him leaping onto the mat and lying down waiting for his treats. It was just amazing!

Reni and Rupert, Australia

 

I can honestly say your books have changed the lives of me and Bo. He loves nothing more than learning new things and playing games, he loved every single part of the process.

Cara and Bo

 

Your "Calm Down" book saved me. Literally! It's only been a week and she is a different dog, relaxed lying at my feet on her mat. I don't hate her any more and have allowed myself to bond with her. I really didn’t think this would ever happen as she was making my home life so stressed out.  Thank You!  

Peggy

 

A surprisingly easy and fun skill to teach!

So go get your book and get started!

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How to stop your dog damaging her stitches

Is your dog injured? And nibbling his stitches? You have to protect the wound to promote healing, but there are many ways to do this! | FREE EMAIL COURSE | dog training, dog health | #doghealth, #dogbehavior, #dogscratching | www.brilliantfamilydog.com

At some stage in his or her life, your dog will need stitches. Could be for neutering, a gash or tear, or something more serious.  

Some dogs will lick obsessively at a wound. This causes skin changes, it inhibits healing, and can introduce infection. So it’s essential that the wound is allowed to heal without being licked and nibbled at.

Many years ago one of my dogs came back from the vet wearing a modified wastepaper bin on his head. They’d cut the base out of it, leaving nasty ragged plastic edges. While protecting the wound they had made in surgery, it created sore patches and cuts all around his neck where it chafed. 

Vets now use a ready-made collar which comes packed flat. This is known as an “Elizabethan” or “Buster” collar to attach to your dog’s own collar. These are large lampshade-type constructions which will fit any size dog. 

They annoy mightily, but they don’t do any damage. Except when the dog catches it in a doorway and it digs into his neck. Or gets food all over the edges. Or is unable to get a drink without spilling the water bowl.

For indoor use only

If your dog needs this to protect the wound, then go for it. But if he’s well enough to go for a walk with you, please take it off! It crashes into things, its appearance will cause problems with other dogs, and it distorts your dog’s hearing so that when you call he’ll head off in the direction he’s facing - as that’s where the sound seems to be coming from! 

If your dog is busy running around, sniffing, and being a dog, he won’t be licking his wound.

There are alternatives. I haven’t tried one, but there are cushion-type collars that are supposed to prevent the dog turning his head round to reach the wound. I guess these could be very effective, depending on the position of the wound, and the elasticity of the dog. For dogs who are able to turn and meet themselves coming back, this probably wouldn't work.

A t-shirt that covers the area may be quite enough. Depending on the size of your dog, you can put a child’s or adult’s t-shirt on him. Tie all the excess material in a knot over his rump, so he can still pee without getting in a mess. 

If your dog can’t leave the wound alone, then obviously the bonnet stays firmly on. 

Coco looks like Buzz Lightyear in his bonnet! You have to protect the wound to promote healing, but there are many ways to do this | FREE EMAIL COURSE | dog training, dog health | #doghealth, #dogbehavior, #dogscratching | www.brilliantfamilydog.com

Not just licking!

Another time when it’s essential is when the wound is on the face or head. A quick scratch with a powerful hind leg can do untold damage in seconds. Dogs never seem to do the minimum scratching necessary to relieve the irritation - they scratch for what seems a pre-determined period, by which time the stitches may all be ripped out. Keep your hat on!

Here's Coco doing his Buzz Lightyear impression ...

But I’ve found that often nothing at all is needed. If I’m watching over my dog I can interrupt any interest in the wound site. The techniques good vets use these days mean that the incision is often tiny and can have minimal stitches or staples or glue to hold it together. So you don’t get the pulling and tweaking you can get with lots of stitches.

Years ago a surgeon told me that they had reduced healing time in his wards dramatically by making the bandages impossible for the patient to interfere with - thus letting the healing take place unhindered - and by having a lounge between the different-sex wards where patients could mingle. This added interest gave them something else to focus on! 

You can do the same by ensuring your dog can’t get at the wound, and by giving him lots of other things to amuse him, including walks, or play in your garden, if appropriate and advised by your vet. Otherwise you can stick to “brain games” - searching, chewing, unwrapping, etc, or just plain ole companionship.

So try relieving your dog of the burden of the dreadful bonnet! You may find it’s only needed occasionally if at all.

 

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